The Yerkes-Dodson law – Psychologyalltopics

The Yerkes–Dodson law is an empirical relationship between human arousal and performance, originally developed by psychologists, Robert M. Yerkes and John Dillingham Dodson in 1908. Two early twentieth-century psychologists studied the relationship of arousal to performance and identified the Yerkes-Dodson law: moderate arousal leads to optimal performance (Yerkes & Dodson, 1908). Arousal Theories of Motivation …

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The Müller-Lyer illusion in Psychology

The Müller-Lyer illusion in Psychology

The Müller-Lyer illusion, which was first given as an illustration by Franz Müller-Lyer in 1889 works on optical illusions. Illusion in psychology          You have just reviewed a number of processes that your perceptual system uses to provide you with an accurate perception of the world. Even so, occasions remain on which your perceptual systems deceive …

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Erikson’s stages of psychosocial development in psychology

Erik Erikson (1902–1994), who was trained by Sigmund Freud’s daughter, Anna Freud, proposed that every individual must successfully navigate a series of stages of psychosocial development known as Erikson’s stages of psychosocial development. Erik Erikson (1902–1994), a prominent psychodynamic theorist, emphasized the importance of social relationships in human development (Erikson, 1963). In his view, human …

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Nativism versus Empiricism

Nativism versus Empiricism-Difference Between

What is the difference between Nativism and Empiricism? This issue is a close relative to the issue of a priori and a posteriori knowledge. Nativism holds that some perceptions are operational from birth, built-in as a natural outcome of the structural and functional properties of the nervous system. By contrast, empiricism holds that all perceptions …

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Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: Examples, Apply and Misconceptions

Abraham Maslow formulated ‘Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs’ ( Paper A Theory of Human Motivation published in 1943). Maslow was a proponent of humanistic psychology, a movement that focused on free will, creativity, individual choice, self-worth, and seeing the “whole person” to understand human psychology.   Maslow believed that people are motivated by the desire for personal …

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overconfidence definition and example

Overconfidence: Definition, Examples, and Study

Confirmation bias is only one bias that can lead us to draw misleading conclusions. Two others are hindsight bias and overconfidence.  Overconfidence Definition psychology  Related to hindsight bias is overconfidence: our tendency to overestimate our ability to make correct predictions. Across a wide variety of tasks, most of us are more confident in our predictive …

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Hindsight Bias: Definition and Examples

What is hindsight bias? Hindsight bias The tendency to think, after something has occurred, that we knew the outcome beforehand.OR hindsight bias tendency to overestimate how well we could have successfully forecasted known outcomes. Hindsight bias definition  Hindsight bias, the tendency to mold our recollection of the past to fit how events later turned out. …

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The Fallacy of Positive Instances vs The Overestimation Effect

What is the fallacy of positive instances and examples?  The fallacy of positive instances is the tendency to remember uncommon events that seem to confirm our beliefs and to forget events that disconfirm our beliefs. Often, the occurrence is really nothing more than coincidence.  The fallacy of positive instances psychology example For example, you find …

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Belief-Bias vs Confirmation bias

Belief-bias and Confirmation bias are both terms related to cognitive psychology. We will explain in very detail with example. What is Confirmation bias in psychology? Confirmation bias describes the tendency to search for information that supports one’s initial view. When people have expectations about a particular person, they address few questions to that person and …

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Deindividuation vs Groupthink

Groupthink meaning What is the difference between Deindividuation and Groupthink? Groupthink is a more extreme phenomenon. Janis (1972) argued that highly cohesive groups that are under stress, insulated from external influence, and which lack impartial leadership and norms for proper decision-making procedures, adopt a mode of thinking (groupthink) in which the desire for unanimity overrides all …

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